PLANT&FOREST

Comparison of vegetation recovery according to the forest restoration technique using the satellite imagery: focus on the Goseong (1996) and East Coast (2000) forest fire

Yeongin Hwang1,†, Hyeongkeun Kweon2,†, Wonseok Kang3,*, Joon-Woo Lee4,*, Semyung Kwon5, Yugyeong Jung3, Jeonghyeon Bae3, Kyeongcheol Lee2, Yoonjin Sim6

1Department of Forest Resources, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Korea
2Department of Forestry, Korea National University of Agriculture and Fisheries, Jeonju 54874, Korea
3Forest Fire Division, National Institute of Forest Science, Seoul 02455, Korea
4Department of Environment and Forest Resources, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Korea
5Division of Administration, Forest Restoration Center, Korea Association of Forest Enviro-Conservation Technology, Cheongju 28165, Korea
6Department of Landscape Architecture, Korea National University of Agriculture and Fisheries, Jeonju 54874, Korea

These authors contributed equally to this work

*Corresponding author: wons4457@korea.kr, jwlee@cnu.ac.kr

Abstract

This study was conducted to compare the level of vegetation recovery based on the forest restoration techniques (natural restoration and artificial restoration) determined using the satellite imagery that targeted forest fire damaged areas in Goseong-gun, Gangwon-do. The study site included the area affected by the Goseong forest fire (1996) and the East Coast forest fire (2000). We conducted a time-series analysis of satellite imagery on the natural restoration sites (19 sites) and artificial restoration sites (12 sites) that were created after the forest fire in 1996. In the analysis of satellite imagery, the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were calculated to compare the level of vegetation recovery between the two groups. We discovered that vegetation was restored at all of the study sites (31 locations). The satellite image-based analysis showed that the artificial restoration sites were relatively better than the natural restoration sites, but there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p > 0.05). Therefore, it is necessary to select a restoration technique that can achieve the goal of forest restoration, taking the topography and environment of the target site into account. We also believe that in the future, accurate diagnosis and analysis of the vegetation will be necessary through a field survey of the forest fire-damaged sites.

Keywords

difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR), forest fire, forest remote sensing, forest restoration, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)

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